Podcasts

Susan Greenfield: Virtual Worlds & False Identities – Social Media or Social Pathology?

January 18, 2008 As communications technologies such as Second Life become more and more sensory and interactive, human beings are increasingly being forced to navigate environments that consistently blur the lines between fantasy and reality. And while most industry analysts praise this next big wave … Continue readingSusan Greenfield: Virtual Worlds & False Identities – Social Media or Social Pathology?

Marco Iacoboni: Mirror Neurons – How Do We Connect with Others Through These “Smart Cells?”

May 20, 2008 To many in the neuroscience community, mirror neurons represent the biggest discovery of the past twenty years. These “smart cells,” which activate when we perform actions and when we see other people performing the same or complementary actions, seem to provide us … Continue readingMarco Iacoboni: Mirror Neurons – How Do We Connect with Others Through These “Smart Cells?”

Bennet Omalu: “Dementia of Football” – The Next Major Public Health Issue?

June 14, 2007 On September 24, 2002, Pro Football Hall of Fame center Michael Lewis Webster died in Allegheny General Hospital’s coronary care unit at age 50. Known as “Iron Mike” during his playing years, Webster’s discipline and overachieving nature helped propel the Pittsburgh Steelers … Continue readingBennet Omalu: “Dementia of Football” – The Next Major Public Health Issue?

Carl Marci: Social Neuroscience – Measuring and Quantifying Human Empathy

November 30, 2008 One of the most exciting areas of neuroscience involves the exploration of the biological and physiological underpinnings of human social interaction. And as researchers discover more and more about the critical role that mirror neurons appear to play in our lives, the … Continue readingCarl Marci: Social Neuroscience – Measuring and Quantifying Human Empathy

John Krystal: Ketamine – The Next Major Breakthrough for Treating Depression?

April 1, 2007 Ketamine has a long history of clinical usage and is known for its effective anesthetic properties. However, ketamine has gained a fair amount of notoriety in recent years as a recreational “club drug” due to its dissociative side effects. But in the … Continue readingJohn Krystal: Ketamine – The Next Major Breakthrough for Treating Depression?

Robert Schwartzman: Ketamine and Chronic Pain – Is There Finally a Cure for CRPS?

March 1, 2007 Our guest on this segment is Dr. Robert Schwartzman, professor and chair of the Department of Neurology at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Over the past couple of years, Dr. Schwartzman and his colleagues in Germany have used ketamine to successfully … Continue readingRobert Schwartzman: Ketamine and Chronic Pain – Is There Finally a Cure for CRPS?

Stephen Ilardi: Is the “Stone Age” Lifestyle the Answer to Eliminating Depression?

April 15 2007 Why is it that, despite unprecedented levels of affluence and advancement in both medicine and technology, we still see skyrocketing rates of clinical depression within the developed world? Could it be that we have altered our environment so radically over the past … Continue readingStephen Ilardi: Is the “Stone Age” Lifestyle the Answer to Eliminating Depression?

William Pardridge: Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery – Neglecting the Obvious?

August 25, 2007 It’s no secret that researchers in both the commercial pharma and academic neuroscience communities are intent on designing new medicines to treat the growing populations of patients afflicted with central nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, and brain … Continue readingWilliam Pardridge: Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery – Neglecting the Obvious?

Anjan Chatterjee: Cosmetic Neurology and the Ethics of Brain Enhancement

May 2, 2009 Advancements in neuroscience have enabled physicians to successfully restore the mental functioning of patients with severe cognitive, mood, and motor disorders. But many of these same therapies can also produce significant mental gains in normal, healthy individuals. This has created a rapidly … Continue readingAnjan Chatterjee: Cosmetic Neurology and the Ethics of Brain Enhancement

Jeffrey Zacks: Predicative Perception – How Event Segmentation Shapes Memory and Learning

September 27, 2011 When we think about our “stream of consciousness,” we don’t really look at it as having any particular order or structure. But according to recent research in this field, we’re constantly making micro-predictions about our immediate environment within this perceptual stream though … Continue readingJeffrey Zacks: Predicative Perception – How Event Segmentation Shapes Memory and Learning

Ilia Karatsoreos: Broken Body Clocks – The Consequences of Disrupting Our Circadian Rhythms

December 10, 2009 We’ve all heard about our “sleep clocks.” But were you aware that we have numerous such clocks all over our bodies – and that disruption of these clocks can have serious health and emotional consequences? In this podcast, we speak with Dr. … Continue readingIlia Karatsoreos: Broken Body Clocks – The Consequences of Disrupting Our Circadian Rhythms

Judith Lauter: What Brain Type Are You? The Science of Human Neurotypology

November 2, 2009 When it comes to individual genetics, certain skills or abilities may actually be hardwired into the brain at birth. And there is compelling evidence to suggest that key hormonal balances during gestation are instrumental in creating specific brain types which strongly influence … Continue readingJudith Lauter: What Brain Type Are You? The Science of Human Neurotypology

Kamilla Miskowiak: Erythropoietin – A New Compound for Depression?

February 25, 2011 Erythropoetin, or Epo, is naturally produced hormone that controls red blood cell production. It is available as a prescription therapeutic agent to treat anemia resulting from chronic kidney disease and chemotherapy. Epo has also been used off label as a blood doping … Continue readingKamilla Miskowiak: Erythropoietin – A New Compound for Depression?

Anna Katharina Braun: Why Fathers Matter – How Single-Parenthood Affects Animal Brain Development

December 8, 2009 Recent research seems to indicate that animals raised without fathers exhibit significant reductions in neuronal growth during the immediate post-natal period. And this reduced brain development translates into adverse behavioral issues later on in life – especially among male offspring. Is it … Continue readingAnna Katharina Braun: Why Fathers Matter – How Single-Parenthood Affects Animal Brain Development

Laura Chaddock and Art Kramer: How Exercise Affects the Shape and Function of Children’s Brains

September 30, 2010 It has been known for some time that aerobic exercise and physical activity can increase cognitive function and affect the development of the hippocampus – the structure deep in the middle of the temporal lobe that’s involved with spatial memory. In fact, … Continue readingLaura Chaddock and Art Kramer: How Exercise Affects the Shape and Function of Children’s Brains

Mahmoud Kiaei: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis – An In-Depth Look

February 22, 2010 Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, otherwise known in the United States as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, is a devastating disorder that affects the control of muscle movement by damaging motor neurons. And while scientists have identified a small percentage of cases that are linked to … Continue readingMahmoud Kiaei: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis – An In-Depth Look

Jonathan Moreno: Neuroscience and National Defense – Science Fiction or Science Fact?

May 14, 2007 In the decades following World War II, a “military-academic complex” has emerged and has been quite active in exploring the potential uses of advanced neuroscience applications for our national defense. But the underlying motives have been fairly consistent – namely, how can … Continue readingJonathan Moreno: Neuroscience and National Defense – Science Fiction or Science Fact?